DID YOU KISS JUDY GOODBYE?  

PART THREE  

 

 Morning-time at weekend. Chris is cooking himself breakfast and is surprised by Judy’s arrival

                             JUDY 

Hello, darling. I’m back. 

                              CHRIS 

Already? Why didn’t you phone?  I would have come to the airport to meet you. 

                              JUDY 

There were so many delays. I didn’t want to get you there on a fool’s errand. Mummy and Daddy send you their love. 

                              CHRIS 

Really? 

                              JUDY 

They were with friends when they said it. Perhaps they didn’t want to sound curmudgeonly. But they said it nonetheless.

                              CHRIS 

Coffee?  Have you had breakfast? 

                              JUDY 

I need a long sleep first. There’s so much I have to tell you. 

                              CHRIS         

It’s been lonely while you’ve been away. The children kept me occupied when they were at home, but they’ve already got their own social lives. They’re out this morning, too.  Netball and football. 

                              JUDY 

I’ve missed you, too.  As soon as I went through the departure-gates I realised what I was leaving behind me. All the time I was with Mummy and Daddy I appreciated why you had seemed like a breath of fresh air when we first met. The years, and the emotion, rolled back. There I was Judy Holder again about to become Judy Walker, and it was a wonderful feeling. 

 

 (Sequence 2) 

Judy finds a number in the newspaper and phones 

Good morning …. I’m replying to the advertisement for a secretary to Sir Joshua …. No. I have to be straight with you. I have no experience that’s in any way relevant. None at all. Just a good character, enthusiasm and ambition. It’s a punt on my part ….  Really?  You don’t mind ….. Quite. An interview doesn’t hurt any-one, and, as you say, with so my applicants I’m not that likely to be successful ….  In that case, please book me in for a morning spot …..  That will be fine.Thank you. 

She replaces the receiver, smiling 

 

(Sequence 3) 

Judy lays aside the book she has been reading, and calls cheerfully to Chris 

                              JUDY 

I’m going to commit murder. I’m going to kill off Cleopatra.  She’s come to the end of her useful life. I’ve taken her as far as she can go. 

                              CHRIS 

Taken aback 

What’s brought this on? 

                              JUDY 

I want a change of life-style. Ever since my schooldays I’m dreamed of having a secretarial job in the city. Being a city-girl myself. That’s what I’m going for now. Cleopatra – bless her - has given me the confidence to achieve all I want to achieve. I can never thank her enough. I’ve already phoned Sir Joshua about his vacancy for a secretary / personal assistant. 

She shows him the newspaper 

                              CHRIS                

Sir Joshua?  He will never see you. 

                              JUDY 

He will. I have an interview for first thing in the morning.  Though ….. I can’t stop my profitable pastime immediately, however much I want to. My life has become so interwoven with the lives of my callers that I can’t disentangle it all at once. Not immediately. But I won’t be taking on any newcomers and shall wind down my old friends as quickly as possible. 

                              CHRIS 

And how long do you think that will that take? 

                              JUDY 

I promise you that it will all over by Christmas. Promise. Cleopatra will be dead along with the turkey and the stuffing. We can start the new year afresh as we mean to go on. Darling, there’s just one thing that will sadden you. And I’m really sorry for it. Honestly. How long is it since we’ve had sex? 

                              CHRIS 

Properly? Not since Cleopatra came into our lives. Sex has been your business, not your private life, and I’ve had to wait on the outside. 

                              JUDY 

But not for much longer. It will to continue to be like that, I’m afraid. For a while at least. If I have to put sexual activity out of my life I have to do it across the board for every one. Then start again over again. Don’t worry, it won’t be long now. 

                              CHRIS 

What made you start with it in the first place? It has always puzzled me. You weren’t a bit like this in the early years of our life together. 

                              JUDY 

I’ve been asking myself that rather a lot lately. It’s something I’ve felt I had to do, and to succeed in doing it. The feeling goes right back to my earliest days. Daddy used to call me short, black and skinny. The type of girl that nobody would fancy. Unlike my sisters who, he said, had class. The worst time was when I over-heard an elderly aunt refer to me as being thin like a streak of gristle who nobody would ever want to cuddle. I wanted to be cuddled. 

Our vicar. The curate actually. Used to interfere with the choirgirls. Even rape them occasionally. He forced them to perform sex acts on him. He was caught eventually and sent away. The story made the local newspapers for a few days. But he never touched me. Never even tried. I was relieved of course, but also insulted. Why was it that men didn’t want to do that sort of thing with me?  What was wrong with me? As I grew into my teens Mummy’s younger sister, Auntie Joy, came to stay with us. She was, as they said then, flighty. With her there was always a man, or more than one man, around. Grasping her, probing her. Unable to keep their hands off her. She did nothing to put them off. Auntie Joy rather enjoyed it. They bought her expensive presents – coats, jewellery, holidays, dinners at posh hotels – things like that. 

There were always wolf-whistles and cat-calls for us when we walked down the street together. For us?  No. Always for Auntie Joy. Never for me. I was the skinny girl in the background. Not that anyone would believe it now. Then I started to develop. 

                              CHRIS 

And when you started to develop, you developed. 

                              JUDY 

In developing I became a housewife, an ordinary housewife. I don’t mean that in a bad way. There’s nothing better than being a housewife. It’s the best job in the world. Yet all the time it felt something had been missing from my growing up.  Then I found out what it was. From the moment we came here. Do you remember the estate agent Mr Fuller?  He was the first but by no means the last to try it on. I found I had the power to attract men. And to influence them. White men. Men of all ages and social standing. Here was my chance to realise that secret ambition. All the while I was merely Mrs Walker there was no outlet for me to express it. 

                              CHRIS 

Then I told you about Patricia. 

                              JUDY 

Yes, you told me about Patricia. It opened up a new range of possibility. If Patricia ….. goofy, buck-toothed – she wore glasses in those schooldays – if she could do sex why …. …….. It was a challenge I had to accept. 

                              CHRIS 

And you accepted it.4 

                              JUDY 

Patricia ….. Auntie Joy …. All of them. Now it’s me the men fancy. Not them.  I had to become Cleopatra to do it. Now I’ve made my point.  I’m going to put Cleopatra out of her and my misery. 

Judy claps her hands and leaves the room triumphantly


(Sequence 4) 

Judy is preparing to go to work for Sir Joshua in London 

                              JUDY 

How do I look? 

                              CHRIS 

Very nice, Mrs Walker. Going out to work without your wig. Gran would be pleased. 

                              JUDY 

It’s so long since I’ve sat in an office. Well before the children were born.  I hope my skills are up to it. 

                              CHRIS 

Your skills are always up to it. Whatever it is you’re asked to do. 

                              JUDY 

I really hyped myself at the interview. Perhaps I’ve hyped myself too much. 

                              CHRIS 

There is only one way for you to find out. 

                              JUDY 

Secretary to the president and chief executive. By pitching to be secretary I had expected to be offered something in the typing pool. That is, to start with at least. But secretary itself. That’s more than I can manage. 

                              CHRIS 

And 9 to 5 hours. Very conventional. 

                              JUDY 

I’m expected to work some unpaid over-time. It goes with the responsibility.

                             CHRIS 

But they are set hours. Even when you were at the Black Swan 

                              JUDY 

Don’t mention that now. It was a different life then. 

                              CHRIS 

You ought to get a move on. You can’t afford to miss the train on your first day at work. 

                              JUDY 

See the children off to school for me. They’re old enough to get their own breakfast. Bye. I’ll give you a call in my lunch hour. 

She kisses him and leaves 

 

(Sequence 5) 

It is lunch-time and Chris receives a telephone call from Judy 

                              CHRIS 

How goes the day? 

                              JUDY 

Rather well.  It’s a lovely office overlooking the park.  Sir Joshua seems to be satisfied with me so far. He’s a crusty old codger, but rather lovely. The office is open plan. I have a sectioned off space right at the end. From there I can communicate with the other dozen or so secretaries. I shouldn’t be lonely. 

                              CHRIS 

Do you know when you will be home? 

                              JUDY 

On time tonight. It’s only Thursdays that I’m likely to be really late. That’s conference day. I must close. Some of the other girls want to take me out to lunch. It’s a bit of an initiation. Bye 

 

(Sequence 6) 

Judy, Chris and Wendy Isherwood are watching Lisa win the gymnastics competition 

                              JUDY 

There’s a competitive edge to Lisa we never see at home. It comes through in her approach to sport and her school-work. 

                              WENDY 

She’s such a quiet girl. We always think of her as the neighbourhood bookworm. 

                              CHRIS 

That’s two sports medals to go with the academic certificates. A team one for the netball and now an individual medal for the gymnastics. 

                              JUDY 

Strange as it may seem she doesn’t like competing publicly. The games teacher had her work cut out to persuade her compete today. She agreed only when the favourite had to drop out through illness. But when she did take part she did so to win. 

                              WENDY 

I wish my Elise would get up off her backside and do something active. 

                              CHRIS 

We haven’t got a car. Lisa has to walk everywhere with the rest of us. That’s what does it.

                               WENDY 

In that case I shall have to hide my Kevin’s car-keys. 

Lisa joins them 

                              JUDY 

Well done, darling. What’s the next step now? 

                              LISA 

Exams.  I shall have to give up sports practice until they are over. 

                              JUDY 

Don’t forget you’re in for the inter-school netball cup. 

                              LISA 

Mum, please let me get over one thing before you think of the next.

 

(Sequence 7) 

As Chris is leaving the meeting, a car pulls up at the pavement. It is driven by Francis, an elderly, tall, thin man with a moustache. He is accompanied by a young vivacious black girl and two other more non-descript passengers. 

                              FRANCIS 

My girlfriend tells me your lift has let you down. 

                              CHRIS         

Yes, he can’t get his damned car to start. 

                              FRANCIS 

My name’s Francis. I’m going your way. There’s room enough here if you don’t mind squeezing in. Can you move over a bit?
That should do it. 

                              MALE PASSENGER 

Aren’t you Judy’s husband? I knew her when she worked at the Black Swan. 

                              CHRIS 

That was a while ago. 

                              FRANCIS    

Everybody comfortable? Let’s get moving.  

 

(Sequence 8) 

Judy and Chris are lunching with Bernard and Daisy 

                              BERNARD 

It’s great to see you so happy again. We were beginning to get worried. Weren’t we Daisy? 

                              DAISY 

You certainly were. I wasn’t so pessimistic. It is obvious you’re made for each other. You had to stay together whatever distractions came along the way. 

                              BERNARD 

Will you be visiting us again in the New Year as usual? 

                              CHRIS 

The first Sunday in January.  The year wouldn’t be the same if we didn’t. 

                              DAISY 

Bernard, would you like to show Chris your new set of books?

                           BERNARD 

He won’t be interested in that. First editions of the Boer War. 

                              DAISY 

It was his specialist subject at university. Of course, you would know that. 

                              CHRIS

First editions – interest me.  The Boer War – always. My grandad was there. Paardeberg, Relief of Kimberley, Driefontein. Then he was wounded and had to come home. 

                              BERNARD 

They’re up in the study. If you come this way …  Mind the paint-pots on the stairway. I’ll get around to moving them soon. 

Bernard and Chris go upstairs 

                              DAISY 

To Judy 

I had to get him out of earshot. His scan at the hospital wasn’t encouraging. He’s definitely got something there. And it’s looking nasty. 

                              JUDY 

Bernard is so calm. He’s the calmest man in a crisis I know. 

                              DAISY 

And so he is usually – if he can work out what’s happening to him. But he can’t work out what it is this time. Don’t let him know I’ve told you. Best let him do that himself when he is ready. It’s as well to be prepared and for my own peace of mind I have to share the confidence with somebody. 

                              JUDY 

I’m honoured that you can trust me. 

 

(Sequence 9) 

Chris returns home in the evening to find Judy with two new work-colleagues. Peggy is short, white in late middle-age. She has a friendly but slightly old-fashioned approach. Lola is a younger, taller African, more reticent in approach. 


                             CHRIS 

What’s this?  A welcoming party? Good evening ladies. 

                              JUDY 

A couple of girls from the office have come with me. 

                              CHRIS 

Smiling 

You haven’t been there more than a couple of weeks yet and you’ve already persuaded them to come here. That’s fast moving. 

                              JUDY 

This is my husband Chris. You’ve heard me talk about him. This is Peggy. She used to live around her. 

                              PEGGY 

I couldn’t resist the chance to come back to see how the area’s developed.6 

                              CHRIS6 

What do you think of it?6 

                              PEGGY 

It’s nice to come return but I wouldn’t want to stay. After leaving here we moved further into the country. My parents used to have the corner-shop down by the roundabout. In those days it had a pink elephant outside for the children to play on. Judy tells me that it’s all Indians or Pakistanis down there now. That’s the way of the world, I suppose. Not that I have anything against them.  They work hard and always try to give what the customer wants. 

                              JUDY 

Lola, here, is more of a townie. 

                              LOLA 

Elephant & Castle. Do you know it? 

                              CHRIS 

I had my first job there when I was a student. Well, near there, Borough High Street. I was working for a paper-supplier. Are you Nigerian? 

                              LOLA 

How did you guess? 

                              CHRIS 

The name Lola. Where else could it be? 

                              LOLA 

London Nigerian. I came here when I was only a few weeks old. That’s my home now. 

                              CHRIS 

Are your family here still? 

                              LOLA 

No. Not any longer. They tried it for a while but went back when our country became independent. My father fought in the civil war. He was a major. 

                              JUDY 

Do you mind if my friends stay for dinner?  Peggy has a car and can drive Lola back to the station. 

                              CHRIS 

Be my guest. It’s good to have the company. Very good. 

 

(Sequence 10) 

Chris is waiting at a pedestrian crossing.  Francis draws up in his van 

                              FRANCIS 

Hi. I’d recognise that hat anywhere. Sorry I didn’t know who you were the other night. 

                              CHRIS 

I’m Chris.

                               FRANCIS 

Crispin, not Christopher.  Yes, I knew all about you even before we met. I’ve shagged your wife half-a-dozen times. I made a note of it. And her performance. She is very good.

                               CHRIS 

What on earth?  You must be mistaken. 

                              FRANCIS 

There’s no chance of that. I didn’t realise she was called Judy though. She kept that quiet. But when I heard she had worked at the Black Swan and you lived around here, she just had to be Cleopatra. A legend in her life-time. That girl. Rather like her famous name-sake. Very lovely, too, if I may so. 

                              CHRIS 

Whatever it was she did, she’s stopped that now. 

                              FRANCIS    

So I’ve heard. It’s some time since I called in at your place.  I can still find the address. I can do that for all the women I’ve shagged. We keep a record. Me and others like me. There’s a little band of us who appreciate the charms of our darker sisters. You could say it’s our speciality. Since I’ve taken up with Geraldine I’ve had to cut out my horny adventures for a while. She’s very jealous and at my age I don’t want to lose a nice young girl like her.
Don’t you believe I can do it?  I’ll prove it to you. I’ll drive past your place one morning this week. 

Francis drives off  

  

(Sequence 11) 

Chris has just told Judy about his encounter with Francis 

                              JUDY 

Francis? Francis? I can’t say I can recall anybody of that name.  

                              CHRIS         

They wouldn’t give you their real names. 

                              JUDY 

Quite a few do. More than you would think. 

                              CHRIS 

Tall, thin. Pension age. Slight moustache. Very talkative. When he was driving us home he said something about having been a teacher in south-east London. 

                              JUDY 

That could fit several of them. Chris, I’m worried.  Whatever happens between myself and my … callers … that’s personal and confidential. They shouldn’t go talking about it outside. Especially to the lady’s husband.  Do you really think he will come here? 

                              CHRIS 

I don’t doubt it. He seems to be the determined type.  The sooner you get right out of this business the better. He’s got me hooked and embarrassed.  I can’t tell him to clear off and he knows it. There’s people in the group who know you otherwise and he’s just as likely as not to tell them. 

                              JUDY 

I’m almost finished with it. 

                              CHRIS 

Almost isn’t good enough. Right out.  Otherwise you can expect more of this sort of thing. You’ve been very lucky so far. In the car he had hinted he was into group sex. He needs an audience. Does that ring a bell now?

                              JUDY 

I’d rather not say. 

                              CHRIS 

If what he told me is true, the conversation he had with me will out among his associates by tonight. And they will know you’re still here. 

 

 

(Sequence 12) 

Chris is leaving his house the next morning. Francis is sitting in his van at the pavement

                               FRANCIS 

Hi, Crispin not Christopher.  I’ve been through that door there a good few times. 

                              CHRIS 

Please, Francis, leave me alone. I’m off to see the doctor. 

                              FRANCIS    

I’m going up by the surgery. Let me drive you there. 

                              CHRIS 

I’ve let you drive me once too often already.  Now …… 

                              FRANCIS 

There’s no need to feel like that. Everybody’s doing it now. Well, quite a lot. When Cleopatra – sorry, I mean Judy – started she was the only black girl at it for miles around. She was unique. Today, well you need only to look at the advertisements.  There’s quite a few darkies as we used to call them, ebony beauties as they say today. 

                              CHRIS 

Francis, I don’t want to hear about it. Please go. 

                              FRANCIS 

That’s how I met Geraldine. She was working from a flat over the African hairdressers on the Broadway.  That was until I persuaded her to leave there and live with me. It was quite a coup for me to get her. You’ll be surprised at who’s on the game these days. Many you wouldn’t think would do it. Do you know the community nurse?  The Nigerian one?

                               CHRIS 

This is my bus. Good-bye. 

                              FRANCIS 

Good-bye. See you later. 

 

(Sequence 13) 

Chris is on the phone to Sylvia Carmichael’s secretary 

                              CHRIS 

Ah that’s a problem.  You expect me to pick up the script this evening?  7 o’clock. That’s in only a couple of hours’ time ……. I have to be at home for the call from Rotterdam. It’s important for me to know where Jan Kok will be meeting me when I get othere tomorrow …. OK.  I shall intercept Judy at the train-station and let her know what to tell Jan when he calls … Yes. I can do it 

 

Chris is pacing up and down the platform, talking agitatedly to himself. He looks at the passengers leaving the train. Judy is not among them. 

                              CHRIS 

I’m sure that’s the train Judy says she takes.  Never mind. It’s rush-hour and there’s sure to be another one soon. Or two. All of them. Everybody rushing here and there. Each one with their own story to tell.  I hate waiting around. I mustn’t let Jan Kok down. He’s one of Sylvia Carmichael’s golden young men. One of the coming boys, as they say.  Come on Judy. What’s holding you back? 

Another train arrives and leaves. Judy is still not there 

She’s not on that one either. She must have come back a different way today. Why didn’t she tell me? 

Chris looks impatiently in the direction of the car-park and sees Judy getting out of the car 

Oh, so that’s the score. In the back seat with him. And re-arranging her dress as the papers would put it. 

                              JUDY 

She comes onto the station forecourt and suddenly notices Chris 

Hello. This is a surprise. 

                              CHRIS 

Obviously. 

                              JUDY 

John was …… 

                              CHRIS 

Don’t bother with that. We can talk about it later. Go straight home. 

                              JUDY 

Where else do you expect me to go? 

                              CHRIS 

Who knows? Please go straight home. A man will be phoning from Rotterdam. Just take down where and when he wants to meet me tomorrow. I’ve got to take this script to London. 

 

 

(Sequence 14) 

Chris finds that Jenny, a secretary, has joined him at the hotel overnight. She is a black girl very similar to Judy but younger and a little taller 

                              CHRIS 

You needn’t have come all this way, Jenny. I could have handled the signing myself. 

                              JENNY 

You know that’s not true. It’s demanding on the body and the mind. And so unfair. Sylvia Carmichael should have sent you some official secretarial help. She has a problem with her purse-strings, and it’s not the only one. 

                              CHRIS 

We need to turn in early. Tomorrow starts at dawn and will be busy right through the day. Goodnight.

                               JENNY 

Goodnight and sleep well. 

  

They go into their respective bedrooms. Later Jenny creeps into Chris’ room and his bed

                               JENNY 

Move over. There’s hardly any room here. 

                              CHRIS 

Jenny, you shouldn’t be doing this. 

                              JENNY 

It’s my job to see that you’re refreshed for the day ahead. Besides, I don’t sleep too well by myself in a strange hotel. I’m like the little girl who doesn’t want to be alone because she’s frightened of the bogey-man. Do you believe that?  Will you protect me from the bogey-man?

                               CHRIS 

But no sex mind. I don’t mix pleasure with business. 

                              JENNY 

Why aren’t I surprised to hear you say that?  What does it matter if it’s only the once?  Who knows what Judy is up to while you’re away?  I bet she’s not always Mrs Perfect. Nobody will ever know. 

                              CHRIS 

I shall know. Don’t think I’m not tempted. You’re a lovely and very kind young lady. If I ever broke my promise I would rather do it with you than any-one. But I know myself too well. If I did break that rule even the once who knows where I’ll be able to stop?  It’s best not start at all. 

                              JENNY 

Give me a cuddle. That’s the least you can do. I’ll still be here if you want me. 

 

(Sequence 15) 

Judy and John the Judge are dressing after having had sex. He hands her a wad of money. 

                              JOHN the JUDGE 

Is that enough? You could call it my season ticket. It saves bringing cash every time I call. 

                              JUDY 

As ever you are more than generous. I did tell you it will have to be the last one. I’m finishing with this work. And I mean that. 

                              JOHN the JUDGE 

Yes, I understand. We’re moving into Kent later this month. With that and increasing age I won’t be able to come here as often as I’d like any way. All the same I shall continue to call on you the until the money runs out and I expect you to be here for me. 

                              JUDY 

Don’t worry. I’ll be here for you. 

She kisses him and puts the money in the drawer 

 

(Sequence 15) 

Tom and Stella Walker are celebrating their Golden Wedding anniversary 

                              UNCLE FREDDIE 

Poor Tom, he’s almost in tears. 

                              CHRIS 

After his heart-attack last summer he didn’t think he’d live to see this day. It was touch and go for a few days. 

                              AUNTIE GRACE 

His speech was marvellous in the circumstances. Though he did rather concentrate on remembering those friends and relatives who are no longer with us. 

                              UNCLE FREDDIE 

Stella’s taking it all very well. She loves a party. 

                              CHRIS 

Especially when she is the centre of attraction. 

                              JUDY 

Fifty years is a long time. Few marriages last that distance today. 

                              UNCLE FREDDIE 

It is wonderful that Alan was able to come here for the occasion. 

                              AUNTIE GRACE 

He can get here more often now that he’s re-located to Western Europe. That will please his mother. 

                              UNCLE FREDDIE 

Don’t take this the wrong way Chris. I don’t mean to be disrespectful. But Stella has always had a special part of her heart for Alan. Even more so than for Tom sometimes, I suspect. 

                              CHRIS 

That’s always been the way. Alan and Mum, Gran and me. 

                              AUNTIE GRACE

 But she’s very proud you’ve given her the grandchildren. Look at her with them now. 

                              JUDY 

And wishing all the time that they were Alan’s. 

                              UNCLE FREDDIE 

It’s strange how parents always used to take sides with their children. 

                              JUDY

 It’s so different now. I could never discriminate between Lisa and Daniel. 

 

 

(Sequence 16) 

Judy is chatting with Wendy Isherwood and Nina Dennison 

                              WENDY 

Do you remember you once said that if ever three or more other black people moved into this street you would move on? 

                              JUDY 

Wendy, that was a joke. I didn’t mean it. 

                              WENDY 

Well, that’s as maybe, but it looks like you may have to think about it. 

                              NINA 

Do you mean the Nigerian church set up in the old warehouse? 

                              JUDY 

That doesn’t count. The congregation there are shipped in just for the service. They don’t live here. And the church isn’t really on this street. 

                              WENDY 

I don’t know how to put this. My Kevin’s heard from his mates at the football supporters’ association that there is a black woman around this way, who ….. let’s say ….. sells her favours. 

                              NINA 

Do you mean she’s on the game?

                              WENDY 

Precisely. 

                              NINA 

Really.  How exciting? Do they know what she looks like? 

                              WENDY 

Short, black and cheerful. 

                              NINA 

That sounds like you Judy. Short, black and cheerful. 

                              JUDY

 That could be anybody. All black people are the same to you. 

She smiles 

Even so I’m getting worried. 

                              WENDY 

She may be like you. Obviously, she’s not you. What a thought! Her name’s Cleopatra. Have you met a Cleopatra? 

                              NINA 

Only on the films. 

                              JUDY 

Joking 

All the same you ought to be careful about your Kevin calling here for the occasional odd-jobs when Chris is away. You’d better come with him to make sure it’s safe for him to be with me. 

They all laugh 

 

(Sequence 17) 

Judy opens a letter  

                              JUDY 

Daddy has sent some money for Lisa and Daniel. But he doesn’t trust us to handle it ourselves. He’s written here that, in his opinion at least, we’re known to be thieves – and all that rubbish. He does go on so. I’m taking the children to pick up the money from his brother’s solicitor at Aldwych. In the circumstances you had better stay here. 

                              CHRIS 

But I have always got well on with Uncle Alfred. 

                              JUDY 

Even so we can’t be too sure. If Daddy should get to hear you were there he’ll only accuse you of putting pressure on his brother. You know what he’s like. He was much more relaxed about you when I was out there. But he only needs to get the wrong end of the stick just once from any gossip he hears and off he’ll go again. 

Children, we have to go now. Say good-bye to Daddy. 

 

Judy and the children depart. Chris continues with his work. There is a knock on the door.  Chris opens it to a very exasperated man.  It is John the Judge. 

                              JOHN the JUDGE 

Where is she?  I told her I’d be here to see her today?  Where is Cleopatra? 

                              CHRIS 

What are you on about? And who are you? 

                              JOHN the JUDGE 

My name is John. People around here know me as the Judge. I used to be a magistrate. I’ve come all the way from Thanet. That’s where I live now and it has been a long jopurney. When you see her - tell her that I’m not at all happy. Not happy at all. 

John the Judge stomps off towards his car 

                              CHRIS 

And good-bye to you. Not au revoir. Adieu. 

  

(Sequence 18) 

Chris breaks the news of his father’s death to the children 

                              CHRIS 

Grandad died early this morning. It was very peaceful. Nana and Uncle Alan were with him at the end. 

                              JUDY 

It wasn’t unexpected, and he had been very ill. 

                              CHRIS 

These last few weeks had been very hard for him. 

                              LISA 

He looked well at the anniversary party. 

                              CHRIS 

Grandad saw that day as the culmination of his life. The most important he had lived since his retirement. He was very happy being surrounded by his family and friends. 

                              JUDY 

And with the memories of those who had gone before him. 

                              CHRIS 

After that he gave up the drive to live. Not the will to live. He wanted to see how you – and we all – developed, but the drive was no longer there. 

                              LISA 

Will we have time off school for his funeral?  I would like to be there. 

                              CHRIS 

I think that can be arranged. I’ll speak to the headmaster. Grandad would have wanted you to be there. He was very fond of you both. 

                              DANIEL 

Will Uncle Alan conduct the service? 

                              CHRIS 

That’s for Nana to decide. Or, at least, for her to work out with her vicar. 

                              LISA 

You ought to say a few words, Daddy. 

                              JUDY 

Yes, Tom would have liked that. Say something about the times you used to watch cricket together when you were a boy. 

                              CHRIS 

Cricket. That was something we could come together on. We disagreed on politics, religion and even how we lived our lives. But cricket had its healing properties. It brought us together.  I’ll do that.

 

(Sequence 19) 

Chris is walking along the street. Francis pulls up by him 

                              FRANCIS

 Hi Crispin, not Christopher. Did I tell you about the time I shagged your wife in the kitchen. Reminded me of the little African nurse that looked like her and sh .. …….. 

                              CHRIS 

Francis. Fuck off Francis. My father’s just died and I can’t put up with your nonsense any longer. 

Francis hurries out from his van, and puts his arm around Chris’ shoulder 

                              FRANCIS 

Sorry, mate. I’ve been through that myself not long ago. It isn’t much fun. I won’t be bothering you again. And if there’s anything I can do. No, perhaps not.  Cheers. 

Francis returns to his van and drives off  

 

(Sequence 20) 

Judy and Chris, and Wendy Isherwood, watch Daniel win the boxing competition 

                              WENDY 

Daniel is a right pocket Hercules. And he’s so slender. Where did he learn to box like that? 

                              JUDY 

I have no idea. We shall have to ask him when he comes down from the podium. 

                              CHRIS 

I was quite prepared to be the loyal father and cheer however he performed. Good or bad. Yet right from the opening bell that left jab was as good as any that I’ve seen. Man or boy. Amateur or professional. 

                              JUDY 

The games teacher thought he was far too small for the tournament. But Daniel proved himself in the gym trials and now here. 

Daniel joins them 

Well done, can you come over here a minute please? Mrs Isherwood has a question for you. 

                              WENDY 

Yes, congratulations Daniel. Where’ver did you learn to punch like that? 

                              DANIEL 

I did it to protect myself. When I started at senior school some of the bigger boys began to pick on me. You know - calling me names and that. They knew I was so shy I couldn’t protect myself with words. So, I did it with my fists. That surprised them. 

                              WENDY 

It certainly did that.  Anyone will think twice on getting on the wrong side of you from now. 

                              DANIEL 

Mummy, Daddy. Do you mind if I dedicate my win to Grandad? 

                              JUDY 

What a thoughtful idea? 

                              CHRIS 

The old man would be pleased, After all, he did buy you your first punch-bag. When you were a toddler. 

                              JUDY 

He did that. 

                              WENDY 

I’m sure your grandad is watching over you and will be very proud. 

 

(Sequence 21) 

It is Judy’s office party. On his way back from the “gents” Chris is approached by Josephine Melville, bubbly, blonde, well-built, in her 30s. 

                              JOSEPHINE 

Chris? Chris Walker? I thought it was you but couldn’t be sure. Do you mind if I have a quick word with you? I’m Josephine Melville – the office manager. 

                              CHRIS 

Yes, I recognise you from the speeches earlier in the evening. 

                              JOSEPHINE 

Of course. You may have wondered why Judy was fast-tracked in here as Sir Joshua’s secretary when she had no relevant references.  Sir Joshua is very pleased with her by the way. He’s a bit too old to be here tonight. Though I can’t remember him having been at these events when he was younger. 

                              CHRIS 

I was a bit surprised when Judy told me about her appointment. 

                              JOSEPHINE 

It was her loyalty. Her loyalty to you. She spoke about helping you with your work. 

                              CHRIS 

Me? Surely, you mean …… 

                              JOSEPHINE 

You’re the writer aren’t you?  Her loyalty is a credit to you both. To Judy for being so loyal and to you for inspiring it.  It was a gamble, I know, but I thought that with loyalty as the cornerstone she could build the other skills around it. And that is how it has worked out. 

They return the party 

 

(Sequence 22 – follows on) 

                              JUDY 

We haven’t had such fun on the dance-floor since we first met at Marjorie’s 18th birthday party. Do you remember that evening? 

                              CHRIS 

I can never forget. I’m such a pathetic dancer I thought you would have nothing to do with me after that. 

                              JUDY 

That was part of the attraction. Your bad dancing made mine look good. 

                              CHRIS 

I was very nervous. I didn’t know anybody there. 

                              JUDY 

That reminds me. I must introduce you to some more of my new friends before we leave tonight. And don’t you linger too long with Lola – mind. 

 

 

(Sequence 23) 

Judy is preparing to go out on a booking 

                              JUDY          

This my last time.  The end of an era. It’s Cleopatra’s last stand. 

                              CHRIS 

Do you have to go?  It’s cold and raining out there. 

                              JUDY 

It’s John the Judge’s final booking.  After tonight his money’s run out. He has agreed it wouldn’t be appropriate for him to come here with all the family present for the holiday. He’s meeting me outside a cheap hotel in Town.  They’ll let us have a room for a couple of hours.  

                              CHRIS 

His last time. Thank goodness. He had started to think he owned your body. 

                              JUDY 

There’s my cab.  Bye. 

She rushes out 

                              CHRIS 

Bye.  Judy, you haven’t …………..

 

(Sequence 24)  

Judy is waiting outside the hotel in the cold and sleet. John the Judge is delayed in arriving by the Christmas traffic.  A group of some half-a-dozen or so hooligans in late-teenage approach. They are rather tipsy, some still carrying beer cans, and apparently looking for a sport of “whore-bashing”. 

 

                              FIRST HOOLIGAN 

I tell you this is where we can the find the tarts. 

                              SECOND HOOLIGAN 

In your dreams. 

                              FIRST HOOLIGAN 

They hang around the hotels here waiting to be picked up. 

                              THIRD HOOLIGAN 

Pointing 

Look a couple of cars are slowing down over there. They’re looking for business. 

                              SECOND HOOLIGAN   

So where are these whores? 

                              FOURTH HOOLIGAN 

Nobody to be seen. 

                              THIRD HOOLIGAN 

There is some-body. Over there by the porch down near the garage. 

                              FOURTH HOOLIGAN 

She’s a spade.  I’ve always wanted to have it with a spade. 

                              FIFTH HOOLIGAN 

Now’s our chance. All of us. 

They approach Judy at a quickened pace 

                              THIRD HOOLIGAN 

Hi, beauty, can you fit us in? 

She turns away from them          

                              FIRST HOOLIGAN 

Darling, we’re talking to you. 

                              FIFTH HOOLIGAN 

Don’t walk away. That’s bloody rude. 

                              FIRST HOOLIGAN 

He tries to catch her arm 

Come here. That’s not very friendly. 

                              JUDY 

She fights him off 

Leave me alone. I’m waiting for someone. 

                              FOURTH HOOLIGAN 

You’ve got time for all of us to fuck you before he arrives. We’ll do it quickly. 

                              FIFTH HOOLIGAN 

I prefer her to suck me with those big nigger lips. 

                              SECOND HOOLIGAN 

She’s got those alright. Give us a kiss. Go on.6 

Judy tries to run6 

                              THIRD HOOLIGAN6 

Stop running.  Stay. 

                              FIRST HOOLIGAN 

Hit her Henry. 

Several of the group try to grab or hit her 

Show some respect. You’re just a whore. And we want you. Get it. 

                              JUDY 

 No leave me alone. It hurts. 

                              FIRST HOOLIGAN 

This’ll hurt even more. And we’re going to keep on doing this to you until you do us all. 

                              JUDY 

imploringly 

John where are you. Come quickly. Quick. 

                              FIFTH HOOLIGAN 

John? I’m Jack. It’s all the same, isn’t it? 

                              FIRST HOOLIGAN 

Keep thumping her until she learns some manners 

                              THIRD HOOLIGAN 

You hold her and I’ll pull her knickers down. 

                              JUDY 

Chris, I’m so sorry 

                              SECOND HOOLIGAN 

Aren’t we all?  

They continue to molest her – one of them, at least, hitting her hard to the stomach. Judy breaks free, but slips and bangs her head on a paving stone 

                              FOURTH HOOLIGAN 

You bloody fool you’ve let her slip. 

                              FIRST HOOLIGAN 

Standing over her 

Get up. Get up. 

                              FIFTH HOOLIGAN 

She isn’t moving. 

                              SECOND HOOLIGAN 

You’ve done it now. She’s dead. 

                              THIRD HOOLIGAN 

There’s a car coming. 

                              FOURTH HOOLIGAN 

Leave her. Just leave her. 

                              THIRD HOOLIGAN       

Just bloody well leave her and run. 

The group scarper 

 

(Sequence 25) 

Chris, emotionally shattered, is being comforted by Bernard and Daisy                          

                               CHRIS 

I didn’t need to be told. When I saw the heard the newsflash I knew it had to be Judy.  It’s what I’ve dreaded ever since finding out what she was doing.  Why didn’t I let her have him here tonight?  On our bed. One further hour of humiliation and then it would have been over for ever. Now it is over for ever. And with it all our future. It was going to be so good again. 

                              BERNARD 

I’m sorry I didn’t believe you when you tried to tell me. Maybe we could have helped. 

                              CHRIS 

Don’t blame yourself. Nobody could have done anything. It was something Judy  just had to get out of her system. Around here she always found the people to help here. And now she has done it. 

Daisy opens the door to two policemen 

                              DAISY 

Come in officer. 

                              POLICE OFFICER 

Please accept our condolences, Mr Walker. It’s a very difficult time for you.  But we must ask you a few questions. 

                              CHRIS 

Yes, I’m aware of that. You have your duty to do. May I come with you to the police station.  Here it’s ……. 

To Bernard and Daisy 

Can you look after Lisa and Daniel until I return?  Tell, them.  No, don’t tell them anything. I shall do that when I get back. 

There’s too much here of Judy. Look at her.  This picture was taken on our honeymoon. My wife.  The woman I thought I would face old age with. It’s only a few hours since she left this room. She would have been on her way back to me now. No, by now she would have been here. It would have been over. Everybody will find out about Judy. What she’s been doing. It will be in the papers, on the radio, the television. She prided herself that nobody would ever know. Friends, neighbours, family, the children, the world. Above all the children. What will it do to them? They will all know. 

                              BERNARD 

That must be the worst part for you. 

                              CHRIS 

No, not that.  The worst part is I didn’t get to kiss Judy good-bye. We can go now officer.

 Chris leaves with the police officers


   
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